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Hibiscus Mini Monograph

Educational Materia Medica

Hibiscus Mini Monograph

Grown and Harvest Hibiscus by Flora's Feast Botanicals

Grow | Harvest with Hibiscus

“In nature there are no colors or shades. Only hues. The flower of the hibiscus is the purest red I know, as if it draws its color from a divine source.”

Toni Morrison


Native to Africa and India, hibiscus is now grown across the world in tropic and subtropic regions. It came to the Americas in the 17th century via trade and those enslaved.


Hibiscus spp. is part of the Malvacea family and a relative to hollyhock, marshmallow, cacao, kola, cotton and okra.


G R O W

Hibiscus spp.

Annual

Zone 9-13


3-9 ft tall and 3-5 ft wide

Moist soil

Full sun

Humid

Does not like to be transplanted or have roots disturbed

Flowers attract pollinators


H A R V E S T

The part used medicinally is actually the calyx (or calyces) which is the compilation of sepals, the green part that supports and protects the flower. Over time, the calyx turns from green to red and becomes plump and meaty. The sepals are picked apart to make what we know as hibiscus "flowers." Pick calyces 1-2 weeks after the blooms have faded.


Mini Monograph Materia Medica of Hibiscus by Flora's Feast Botanicals

Make with Hibiscus

“There are two kinds of people in this world. Those who love Hibiscus, and those who haven’t tried it yet.”

Unknown


P R O P E R T I E S

Antimicrobial | Anti-inflammatory

Antioxidant | Astringent

Demulcent | Diuretic


E N E R G E T I C S

Cool

Moist


C O N S T I T U E N T S

Vitamin C

Iron

Mucilage

Pectin

Anthocyanins

Citric, Malic and Tartaric Acid


M A K E

Tea: colds, cough, sore throat, blood pressure, cholesterol, heart, liver and kidney tonic, moisten tissue,

Tincture: not extracted well by alcohol

Oil: antioxidant, sores, wounds

Food: combines well with raspberries, flavor similar to cranberry or tart cherry, beverages, jam, jelly, chutney, vinegar. Some cultures use the leaves which taste like a spicy spinach.


For educational purposes only.

Not intended for medical advice.

Always consult your physician.


Purchase herbs by visiting Mountain Rose Herbs


Folklore and Fables of Hibiscus by Flora's Feast Botanicals

Folklore and Fables of Hibiscus


Its name hibiscus comes from the Latin word "ibis" which means "stork" due to the similarity to a stork's beak. In Greek, hibiskos is the word for mallow.


Common names include roselle, (red) sorrel, flor de jamaica, Florida cranberry, and lemon bush.


Ruled by Venus and the sign Scorpio, its element is water.


In floriography, or Victorian Language of Flowers, hibiscus signifies delicate beauty.


Like roses, the color of the hibiscus given had its own meaning. White is purity, yellow is good luck, pink is friendship, purple is mystery and rose is passion.


Symbolism includes:

Lust

Love

Passion

Harmony

Femininity

Friendship

Youth


Hawaiian and Polynesian women wear hibiscus behind one ear or the other to state their relationship status. If the bloom is behind her left, she is attached, but behind her right, it signals she is available.


In Greek mythology, Adonis turned himself into a hibiscus flower to distract goddesses Persephone and Aphrodite from a feud.


Kail, the Hindu goddess of primordial power, is often depicted with hibiscus as it symbolizes her tongue which sticks out displaying her fierce energy. Swipe to see Kali.


Marriage wreaths were worn in the tropics to attract blessings.


Hibiscus varieties are the national symbol of Haiti, South Korea, Malaysia, Solomon Islands and Niue. It is the state flower of Hawaii.



Kali with Hibiscus by Flora's Feast Botanicals

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